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of antigovernment protesters have renewed their marches in cairo and other cities. they've there have been a number of clashes with security forces who have been firing tear gas and water canners. but after more than a week of unrest, president morsi has issued a statement saying those behind the violence will be held politically accountability -- accountable. >> flashes on the doorstep of the presidential palace. the fires from the cocktails thrown, a message to muhammad morsi. the people feel betrayed. the revolution was supposed to turn egypt into a country where everyone prospered. and where there was justice. for these people who gathered earlier in their new regular friday rituals, reform is coming far too slowly. >> we're back to another demonstration in tahrir square. of course piece people feel passionately about wanting to change things. there are many, many egyptians who feel demonstrations like this are counterproductive and need to stop. ahmed is one of those who feel that after so many decades of dictatorship, the new president needs more time to fix things. >> right nouts not the rig
, and schools closed in a number of cities. forecasters predicted new england would get the worst of it with up to three feet of snow likely in boston. mayor thomas menino. >> this is a storm of major proportions. stay off the roads. stay home. let the public works crews do their job. >> brown: the region also braced for winds reaching 75 miles an hour that will pile up drifts and almost guarantee widespread power outages. as ever, the threat prompted shoppers to pack stores, stocking up on supplies. >> this is panic shopping, so bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> you've got to plan ahead. a couple feet of snow would shut everything down and, who knows, it could be a couple of days, right? >> brown: in new york city, predictions called for as much as a foot of snow, and mayor michael bloomberg said the city had marshaled an army of plows and salt trucks. >> the sanitation department will deploy something like 1,700 snowplows and 65 front-end loaders. it also has 450 salt-spreaders already deployed. >> brown: the storm also focused new concern on the new york and new j
've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building where about 250 people worked. the cause of the blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping down. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt and
at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufacturers. in new york last week, the city school teachers pension fund sold off $13.5 million it held in stock with five gun makers. that followed action in california where the state teachers retirement system also stripped itself of $11.7 million of investments from three gun manufacturers. and the golden state's $254 billion public employees retirement system is also deciding whether to withdraw the $5 million worth of shares it holds in two companies. in chicago, mayor rahm emmanuel focused on banks, asking t.d. bank and bank of america to stop financing gun manufacturers. chicago's gun violence has placed it in the center of the national debate. michelle obama attended the funeral of hadiya pendleton who was shot to death near her school days after marching in the presidential inaugural parade and pendleton's parents joined mrs. obama as her guest at the state of the union speech last week. president obama returned to his hometown last week to
september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still presents with two people who have studied the epidemi
reportedly killed at least 20 people. the mortars exploded, killing one of the players. the city of aleppo has seen some of the most intense fighting. conway filed this report. >> the night sky troubles with the sound of war, -- trembles with the sound of war. thousands have lost their lives. as the fighting spreads, many parts of syria and now look like this. rebel fighters have made any gains in the north. towns, military bases, air fields. they have the misfortune of lying beside their necks and biggest target so far. aleppo region and now they're next biggest target so far, aleppo airport. -- they have the misfortune of being beside the next biggest target so far, aleppo airport. >> this is now a key strategic target for the rebels. if they take this, not only will it have been a strategic success also an important symbolic victory. >> controlling the airport means wiping out the army. it could deal a blow to their morale and would be a major boost to us as well as giving a great military who assets. >> civilians pay the highest price for this ambition. a battle for their future that m
of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build in better safeguards. at the same time, the board said investigators are still weeks away from determining what caused a battery fire on a japan airlines dreamliner in boston. in the meantime, all 50 of the planes in service, remain grounded. budget battle cries echoed up and down pennsylvania avenue in
traits come easily for students who have grown up in the city's roughest neighborhoods where they have already developed an inner strength remarkable for their age. >> often times those skill sets are not point pointed as assets. often times kids think that they walk into this environment with liabilities. we think it's completely opposite. >> reporter: once the students move on to college they stay in regular contact with their one goal teacher through their first year. the aim is not just to get kids into college but to equip them with the support system they need to finish. >> we've seen 20, 25 years of education reform in the united states. almost all of it has been directed in prek through 12 which has -- so we see that proliferation of charter schools we've seen early childhood interventions work, we've seen human capital providers, we've seen big city mayors like rahm emanuel take over education yet almost none of it has spread to higher education. so our country has begun to get college access right but we see huge dropout rates in college. >> reporter: cynthia barren is a coac
when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of state from 1997 to 2001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown an
, and french troops now have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jorda
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the story of dick cheney is the story of power. he served two terms as vice president, president george w. bush from twub two 2008. he was also secretary of defense he was also chief of staff to president gerald ford. the "washington post" has called him the most influential and powerful man ever to hold the office. he was in washington an insider. his story is a story not only of power but because of what happened after 9/11 it's a story of power and values. we begin a conversation that took place in washington. mr. vice president, thank you very much for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot and as of last march i got a transplant, go
in the hills south of the city where in just a few minutes he will take leave of his office. >> brown: a short time ago i talked to john allen near st. peter's square. he's an analyst for cnn and a correspondent for the "national catholic reporter." so,, as we watch the pope fly away today, is his future role as emeritus pope clear? it's a new position, after all. >> it is. what benedict the 16th has told us is he is going to be hidden from the world which means he's not going to be, at least publicly, hearing him, secretary-general him. he's not going to hit the lecture circuit or give interviews. we assume he will see people in private but the vatican won't issue news bulletins about those encounters so for all intense and purposes he's had his swan song on the public stage. that much is clear. what is less clear are two points: one, if he is going to continue to have any sort of behind-the-scenes role of the next pope. whether the next pope will seek his counsel. whether there will be conversation. and secondly how the role of a retired pope will play out in front of the broader court of op
during six months of intense urban warfare. this weekend, the city will commemorate the event. we have been talking to some of the survivors. >> 70 years since the end of one of the world's bloodiest battles. the memorial remains one of the most symbolic sites in russia. here come close to a million soldiers died in just six months of ruthless combat. a breath-taking german advance into russia had been blocked at stalingrad. hundreds of thousands of men died in a brutal urban warfare as the red army refused to yield. then, once the russian winter set in, fresh soviet forces surrounded the entire army, killing or capturing every man. the german commander was forced into a humiliating situation. this man witnessed the surrender, but the images that etched most strongly on his memory are the images of death and a burning river. >> everything was on fire. the bank of the river was covered mixed with human heads, arms, legs. there are the remains of people who were being taken across when they were bombed. >> the scale of the loss of life is almost beyond imagination and it all happened in
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: benh zeitlin is here. when he made his direct orial debut "beast of the southern wild" last year it became a movie everybody is talking b the story of hush puppie a 9-year-old girl faced with the illness of her father. it became the runnaway hit of lastier's film festival skirt winning awards at sundance and at cannes and now nominated for four academy awards including best director and best picture. here is the trailer of beasts of the southern wild. >> the whole universe depends on everything fitting together just right. if one piece busts, even the smallest piece, the entire universe -- >> this here is an auroch, a fierce creature. >> the storm's coming. >> the you all better learn how to survive. >> it is pie job to take care of you, okay? >> all was quiet goes hine my eyes, i see everything that made made me. >> flying around in invisible pieces. i see that i'm a little piece of a big, big universe. >> you going to be the king, i promise that. >> in a million years, when kid goes to school, they going to know, once there was a hushpuppy and sh
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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